When people  ask me why I decided to attend nursing school, which is quite often, I simply reply “the profession of nursing more or less chose me”. The reply leaves many confused and wanting an explanation, but even something so obvious and so clear to me, never seems to make sense when I put it into words. Honestly, a career in nursing was not something I dreamed about since the age of 5, and still had not even crossed my mind during my senior year of high school. However, I would not change any part of the journey that brought me to the field of nursing.

Throughout high school and as far back as I can remember, I have always been a person who valued traveling on one set path. The pre-med option and medical school was the set path for me, in which I could not even imagine straying from in any way.  My parents and the bubble I lived in as a cheerful high school senior fueled many of my ambitions at the time. However, with a death in the family and my initial drop out of college in the fall semester of 2006, my path was quickly derailed. During that time in my life I felt like a rug had been pulled out from underneath my feet; however, I slowly picked up the pieces of my existence and applied to Boston College for spring 2007 admission.

That first semester of college was tumultuous and confusing. I realized I was a different person than who I was one year ago and resuming the path set in high school was no longer the right one for me. With every emotion possible flowing freely through my mind and body, I was lost and decided to seek the help of an advisor who urged me to consider nursing as a career. At the time, nursing was a foreign concept, something that simply was never brought to my attention before. I decided to begin taking nursing courses the following semester. From the moment I glanced at the nursing curriculum a flood of warmth rushed through my body and I felt “at home” with my new path.

My decision to become a nursing student was life changing and risky, but wonderful and emotional. The “real world” experience of clinical is indescribable and exciting. It also adds depth to the character of a nursing student because I have had the privilege to share the experience of childbirth with one family, but the sorrow of a cancer diagnosis with another. Although there have been times when I have been caught up with papers and exams, I think about my long term duty to the patients and to being a part of perfecting nursing practice. So you ask me once again, “why nursing school?” and I simply respond that I cannot picture myself doing anything else in the world. Becoming a nurse for me is like going home for Thanksgiving break; it’s familiar, it’s exciting, and it’s something I truly look forward to.

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